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Full text of "Pennsylvania Museum Bulletin. Number 39, July 1912"

^ BULLETIN 

OF THE 

PENNSYLW^IA MUSEUM 



r 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY 

BY THE PENNSYLVANIA 

MUSELN AND SCHOOL 

OF INDUSTFOAL ART 



MBMOFUAL HALL 
FAIRMOUNT PARK 



$1.00 YEARLY 



L-^econd-Class Matter, under Act of Congress ol Jui\ 



P E N N S Y L VA NIA MUSEUM 

AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



»oar& of trustees 



The Govebnob of the State, Ex-Of. 



The Mayor of the City, Ex-Of. 



Charles Bond 
James Butterworth 
John G. Carrutu 
Charles E. Dana 
Thomas Dolan 
Harrington Fitzgerald 
Charles H. Harding 



Mrs. John Harrison 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 
John Story Jenks 
John H. McFadden 
John D. McIlhenny 
John T. Morris 
John W. Pepper 

©fficcre 



Theodore C. Search 
Edgar V. Seeler 
G. Henry Stetson 
Edward T. Stotesbury 
Jones Wister 
William Wood 



Vicf-Presiden Is 



THEODORE C. SEARCH, President 

JOHN STORY JENKS, 

JOHN G. CARRUTH, 

JAMES BUTTERWORTH, Treasurer 

EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, Secretary 

LESLIE W. MILLER, Principal of the School 



EDWIN ATLEE BARBER, Editor 



Bulletin 

jfor Sulu, IRincteen Mun^rc^ anD twelve 
CONTENTS 



Aiiditioiial Furniture Sections, by 
Mrs. Cornelius Strvm-;, ,n 

Recent Accessions 

Not( 

Review ..... 

List of Accessions 



0/ 
4.1 

45 
491 




TWO ADDITIONAL FURNITURE SECTIONS OPENED 
TO PUBLIC. MAY 27, 1912 

GOTHIC ALCOVE 

At the suggestion of Mrs. John Harrison, who has very generously agreed 
to provide the necessary Gothic furniture by gift, purchase or bequest — a 
Gothic alcove was fitted out this winter and opened to the public on May 27th. 
The work of decoration was carried out by the Museum staff according to the 
illustration of a medijeval banqueting hall, reconstructed by Mollet le Due, the 
celebrated antiquary architect '^* in which a banquet given by the Duke of 
Lancaster to the King of Portugal in 1386 was held. This is described by 
Froissart '■~^. The ceiling with its beams, its supports and its corbels has been 
reproduced as accurately as the limits of the small space allowed (21 x 12), 
and the alcove closely follows the end of the banqueting hall which served 
as the model. 

In the side walls, have been inserted as a wainscoting a series of twelve 
genuine, finely carved Gothic oak panels of the fifteenth century, presented by 
Mrs. John Harrison, and above these, between the corbels supporting the ceiling 
are hung eight ancient Gothic carvings and mediaeval pictures, several of which 
formed a part of the Charles Godfrey Leland Collection presented to the 
Museum by his sister, Mrs. John Harrison. 

At present the alcove contains but a fine Gothic chest and a quaint lavabo 
of Gothic style, parts of which are of great age. It is Mrs. Harrison's intention 
to collect the pieces of Gothic furniture characteristic of the period not already 
in her possession, and eventually to make the alcove truly representative of. 
mediseval Europe. 



CO Diet. Raisonne du Mobilier Frangais, Vol. I, PL XVII. 
(2) Chron. Liv. Ill, Chapter XLI, edit. Buckon. 



38 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 




o 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



39 




40 



BULLETIN OF THE PE\'NSYLVAXL\ MUSEUM 



ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ALCOVE 

A similarly planned alcove, but representative of the period of the Italian 
Renaissance, was also thrown open to the public on May 27th. For this room 
the furniture was already in the possession of the Museum. As model, W. H. 
Ward's reproduction of the Gallery of Francis I in the Palace of Fontainebleau 
was called into requisition, and from his valuable book '•'' was chosen the illus- 
tration of the Hall decorated by II Rosso, the Italian artist of the sixteenth 
century, which served as a guide for the fitting out of the alcove with suitable 
panelling and ceiling. A carved walnut mantelpiece of Italian workmanship, 
a reproduction of the Florentine decorative art of the Renaissance, obtained 
by the Museum at the Centennial Exposition of 1876, was fitted into the wain- 
scoting with telling effect. Two finely carved chests of the sixteenth century, 
one of which is a part of the becjuest of Dr. Lamborn, a highly decorative table 
of the seventeenth century which is a loan from the Philadelphia Library 
Company, and two elaborately carved cabinets of the sixteenth century, of 
which one is a gift from the late Miss Elizabeth W. Lewis — as well as a varied 
assortment of chairs, form ample furnishing for the space. A harpsichord of 
the sixteenth century, the case of which is painted with colored landscape, and 
mermaids and scrolls on a white ground, is also interesting, while of two 
mirrors, one is especially worthy of notice as highly carved and characteristic 
of the elaborate workmanship of the period. S. Y. S. 



RECENT ACCESSIONS 

While it has always been the policy of the Aluseum to illustrate bv its 
collections the arts of all times and countries and to cover the entire field of 

the industrial and decorative arts, special 
efforts have been made in late years to 
gather together collections illustrating the 
historv and development of the arts of this 
country. This is a field which no other 
museum has as yet seriously entered. The 
Museum's collection of American pottery 
and porcelain, the only important one of its 
kind in existence, is now practically com- 
plete. The collection of American glass 
covers the entire history of this country 
from the year 162 1, when a glass factory 
was established at Jamestown, Va., for the 
manufacture of window glass, and beads 
fen- tratfic with the Indians, down to the present time. Whilethis collection is 

France,' 




ENAMEL ON METAL 
Painted by William Bitch about 1826 



(.1) "Tlie .^rcliitectiire of the Renaissance in 
Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1912. 



1495-1830. Vol. I, p. 119, 



1 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLV^ANIA MUSEUM 



41 



not yet complete, it is the most important of its kind. A creditable beginning 
has been made in the formation of a collection of American metal work, 
including silver, pewter, brass and wrought iron, which is gradually being 
increased. 

Other branches of art which have been developed in the L-nited States, 
are mother-of-pearl carving { several important examples of which are on exhi- 




CHINESE HARD PASTE PORCELAIN 

Late Eighteenth Century 

Imitation of German Porcelain 



bition here), and enamel painting. Among the pioneer enamel painters was 
Edwin Bishop, of Philadelphia, who, in the year 1842, sent to the annual 
exhibition of the Franklin Institute several specimens of his enameling on 
metal, of which two good examples are in this Museum. 

The Museum has just come into possession of a specimen of early Ameri- 
can enamel painting, in the form of a rectangular panel, i".,^ inches by ij4 
inches, set in a gold mounting as a breast pin. The design is of historical 
significance and has been painted in colors on the white enamel. In the fore- 
ground is a chariot drawn by three horses. Liberty, in the costume of an 
American Indian, stands in the chariot and holds in her right hand the United 
States flag, while in her left she grasps a bow. Fame in the form of an angel 
hovers above. In the background is a crowd of people, while in the distance 
is a building, possibly representing the Capitol of the United States. A dove 
with olive branch hovers over the heads of the horses, while at the extreme 
left may be seen a portion of the Temple of Fame. The design is delicately 
and minutely painted, and the initials of the enameler, "W. B.," are in the 
extreme lower left hand corner. 

The catalogue of a loan exhibition of historical portraits exhibited in the 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in December, 1887, and January, 1888, 
contains a biographical sketch of William Russell Birch, prepared by Charles 
Henry Hart, Esq., which is as follows : 



42 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLA'ANL-\ MUSEUM 



"Enamel painter and engraver, born in Warwick, England ; received medal 
of the Society of Arts, 1784, for the production of a new enamel color; settled 
in Philadelphia 1794, when he dropped his middle name. An unfinished MS. 
autobiography in the possession of his great grand-son, states that he made 
'a correct drawing' of Stuart's Lansdown portrait of Washington, from which 
he made about 60 copies in enamel. He was said to have painted Washington 
from life in 1796: but the manuscript above referred to makes no mention of 
a sitting though recording an invitation received through Stuart, and declined 
on grounds thus expressed : 'That I would consider it a mark of the highest 
imposition to trouble the General to sit to me ; but when I had copied his 
(Stuart's) picture of him in enamel, which was my forte, that I would show it 
to the General and thank him for his kind offer.' This was done, but the 




SILVER SUGAR BOWL AND CREAMER 
Made by Edward Lownes, Philadelphia, about 1819 



account of it says nothing about a renewal of the offer of a sitting. Birch 
designed and engraved a number of views of country seats, principally on the 
Scluiylkill; and, in 1800 commenced the publication of his 'Views of Philadel- 
phia,' choosing the subjects, and directing his son Thomas in the drawings, 
and Seymour in the engravings. Died 1834." 



BULLETIN OF THE PENXSYL\'AXL\ iAIUSEUM 



43 



Mr. Hart, who has examined this enamel carefully, states that, in his 
opinion, there is not the slightest doubt as to its being the work of William 
Birch. "It is his exact manipulation and in verification I have found in his 
'Book of Profits' which I have, under date of June 14, 1826, this entry, 'Mr. 
Richards, Jew'r., Broadway, the box. Triumph of Independence of the L^nited 




CAST IRON STOVE PLATE 
Made at Reading, Pa , 1772 

States, a piece of Frisks, $3.00.* " Mr. Hart believes this to be the identical 
piece which is here illustrated. He is not able, however, to explain what the 
words, "box" and "Frisks" mean. Several other examples of Birch"s enamel 
paintings are owned by public institutions and collectors in Philadelphia, and 
this is considered a good example of his genre work, which according to the 
above statement probably dates back to 1826. 

The Museum desires to build up a collection of American enamels on 
metal, and it is hoped that possessors of specimens will be willing to place their 
examples in the Museiun, either on loan, or as gifts. 

A set of hard paste porcelain, recently presented by Mrs. Hampton L. 
Carson, is of more than usual interest since, while it was made in China, at the 
beginning of the nineteenth century, for the European trade and belongs to 



44 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 



that class of ware incorrectly called "Lowestoft," it is an exact copy of German 
hard paste porcelain of the period. The decoration consists of classical figures 
painted in black on a deep orange yellow ground. The forms of the plates, cups 
and saucers are exact copies of German porcelain, but the shapes of the sugar 
bowl and helmet-shaped cream pitcher are purely Chinese. 




LARGE SLIP-DECORATED POTTERY DISH 
Holland, 1768 



The Museum has also come into possession of additional examples of old 
American silver, in the form of a sugar bowl and creamer, with both repousse 
and chased decoration, made by Edward Lownes, of Philadelphia, about 1819. 

An addition to the collection of early American iron stove plates is a rare 
example by James Old, of the Reading Furnace, Pennsylvania, in 1772. The 
collection of Pennsylvania-German stove plates owned by the Museum, some 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSiYLVANIA MUSEUAI 45 

of them named, dated and inscribed, will form the subject of an article in a 
future number of the Bulletin. 

To the series of slip decorated pottery has been added a red pottery plaque, 
nineteen inches in diameter, with relief decorations representing the spies 
bearing the bunch of grapes from the land of Canaan. Beneath is the Dutch 
inscription, in yellow sHp, "Det is bet landt Cana dat Israel gegeven is." Above 
the figures is the date 1768, and around the margin in bold relief is a scroll 
design of acorns and grapes. The coats of the figures and the border pattern 
are colored green. 

Dutch dishes of this character may be seen in the Rijks Aluseum, 
Amsterdam, and in the Kunstgewerbe Museum of Cologne, the latter collection 
probably being the most complete of its kind in existence. 



NOTES 

New Cover Design — The design for the cover of this number of the 
Bulletin was drawn by Aliss Grace G. Kelley, a pupil of the School. 



New Members — New members have been elected during the year as 
follows : Life members — Miss Mary Blakiston, Mrs. Jasper Yeates Brinton, 
Mrs. Hampton L. Carson, Mrs. John Francis Combs, Henry Reed Hatfield and 
Mrs. John Frederick Lewis. Annual members^Miss Willian Adger, Miss 
Emily Bell. Frederick Eick, Mrs. William W. Farr, George H. Freedley, i\Irs. 
Annesley R. Govett. Charles H. Harding, Charles M. Lea, Mrs. Arthur V. 
Meigs, Most Rev. E. F. Prendergast, ]\Irs. Henry J. Rowland, ]\Irs. J. Bunford 
Samuel, jNIrs. Samuel Spackman. 

c=fto 

Sp.-\nish C.vnnon — The two large bronze cannon and mortar which were 
brought from Cuba just after the Spanish- American War, and presented to 
the City by the Fairmount Park Art Association, have been removed from the 
Columbus monument to the entrance of Memorial Hall, where they have been 
mounted on suitable carriages which have been constructed under the super- 
vision of Prof. Charles E. Dana. The mortar, which is dated 1731. occupies 
a place at the top of the steps in front of the main entrance, while the cannon 
have been mounted on the two abutments at the sides. One of these bears the 
inscription, "Josephus Barnola Fecit Bar 1743." The other is inscribed "Solano 
Fecit Sevilla Ano D 1737." All of them bear the Spanish arms and the 
inscription "Philip V Hispani Rex. Elisabeta Farnesio Hisp. Regina." In 
their present position, these handsome examples of the brass founder's art of 
the eighteenth century can be inspected and studied with greater facility. 



46 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

Reception — The occasion of the reception held on the afternoon of May 
27th in honor of the ladies accompanying the delegates to the Twelfth Inter- 
national Congress of Navigation, was selected for the public opening of the 
new furniture alcoves as well as for Members" Day, which comes annually 
about that time. This turned out to be a happy combination. The weather was 
propitious and some four hundred and thirty guests, foreign and other, 
assembled in the rotunda of Memorial Hall, where refreshments were served. 
An invitation had been extended to the delegates, and a number of them accom- 
panied their wives or joined them, after their sectional meetings closed, 
examining the collections of industrial art as well as the Wilstach collection 
of paintings, and admiring the grounds. On the whole the occasion proved the 
most successful social event of the kind given at Memorial Hall in many years. 



School Notes — The Commencement Exercises were held at Horticul- 
tural Hall on the evening of Thursday, June 6th. Hon. Wm. C. Sproul deliv- 
ered the Commencement address, which was an earnest plea for Industrial Art 
Education as representing the one element of which our whole educational 
system is in great need, and as offering the only adequate means of promoting 
the industrial efficiency of the Commonwealth. He paid an eloquent tribute to 
the work of the Pennsylvania JMuseum and School of Industrial Art and hoped 
tliat it would be more generously supported by the State, whose highest interests 
it was doing so much to advance. Thirty-four graduates received the diploma 
for the full course, twenty-two of whom were in the Art Department and twelve 
in the Textile Department. 

Large classes also completed courses of one and two years, and a long list 
of prizes was awarded. 

A collection of thirty-nine reproductions of Italian and Spanish maiolica 
made by Cantagalli from originals in the Museums of Florence and Madrid, 
was presented to the School by Mr. John T. Morris, being selections 
bearing upon the work of the classes in historic ornament generally, quite as 
much as upon the special work in pottery. The School has been very much 
enriched in its collection of material for the students' study, during the past 
year, and the stronger showing of these particular classes indicates the great 
advantage it gives to them to come in direct contact with the real objects. The 
study from plates has practically been rendered entirely unnecessary. 

Mr. Yellin, the School's instructor in wrought iron, has received and is now 
executing the order for tlie gate to Mr. J. Pierpont JMorgan's country place on 
Long Island, said to be the largest ever made in America and (it might be 
added) it will undoubtedly be the finest. The elaborate acanthus leaves' form- 
ing the ornament are as rich as any plastic modeling, and show the work of a 
master hand, one perfectly acquainted with the possibilities of the material. 
The influence of such a craftsman upon the product of a class can readily be 
seen in this year's exhibition. 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSiYLVANL\ MUSEUM 47 

The list of prizes this year was increased by additions from Mrs. Thomas 
S. Harrison, Mrs. J. L. KetterHnus, Mrs. Arthur H. Lea, Mrs. C. Shillard 
Smith. 

Through the courtesy of the committee in charge of the "Arnold Mansion" 
(Mount Pleasant) in the park, the students of the Interior Decoration and 
Illustration Classes were enabled to make measured drawings of the interior 
and to sketch in the neighborhood, during May, having the house as head- 
quarters. The excellent results were in evidence at the June exhibition. 

A jewel casket in copper and silver with inlays of green stones, by Frederick 
Charles Clayter, is an original design made by him from his studv of Byzantine 
examples in the Museum, and from the reproductions presented bv the Associate 
Committee of Women the past year to the School. 

Another casket is a combination made by Edith Dorothy Finley and Olive 
Irene Merriam, in the same style, but depending for its effect entirely upon the 
contrasting surfaces of the materials and color. The round and oval turquoise 
set in the silver give a very rich touch to the quaint, rather primitive, forms. 
The scheme is a perfectly simple block in contrast to Mr. Clayter's architectural 
motive. 

The work in silver and enameling has this year, for the first time, been 
displayed adequately. The introduction of mosaic into the cement garden 
pottery has also developed sufficiently to make a definite impression in the 
structural design department. 



LA FAIENCE ET LA PORCELAINE DE MARSEILLE 

REVIE-W 

zVn important work on the Alaiolica and Porcelain of Marseilles, by the 
Abbe G. Arnaud d'Agnel, who is correspondent of the Department of Public 
Instruction in France, is published in the series of five volumes now being 
issued on the Arts and Industries of Provence under the auspices of the Societe 
Anonyme des Arts Graphiques, of which Ale.x. Jouvene, 19 Rue Lafayette, 
Marseilles, is Editorial Agent. The work is preceded by a preface by G. 
Papillon, the Curator of the Aluseum and Collections of the National Factory of 
Sevres. The French have been somewhat slow to publish in such handsome 
monographs the products of their great centres of industrial arts. In this they 
have lagged behind England, Germany and Italy. Of late, however, a certain 
activity in this direction has been noted of which the present work on the 
ceramic development of the South is a most creditable result. There was as 
yet no complete study of the Marseilles factories, although they are related to 
the movement of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and, owing to the 
excellence of their products, hold an important place in the development of 



48 BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

French niaiolica. It is true that some French writers from time to time had 
touched upon the subject in short papers, which have served Father Arnaud 
d'Agnel as foundations for his monumental work. 

The latter may be divided into three parts — Biographies of the masters ; 
technical aspects of the maiolica and their artistic value ; and, lastly, the 
economic history of the ceramic industry. The author has gone for all historical 
information to original sources and has drawn largely from provincial and 
notarial archives. From the latter the names of a number of manufacturers 
have been exhumed and contracts with apprentices have revealed the relative 
degree of their importance. Certain blood affiliations between famous artists 
have been established ; and he has also shown the influence of the great ceramic 
centres of Nevers. Rouen, Strasbourg, on the Marseilles maiolica. Very 
important information will be found on the establishment of Veuve Perrin and 
of Leroy that turned out products of such well-defined character that anything 
concerning them is of utmost value for the general history of French ceramics. 
Jiloreover the importance of the text of the book of recipes of the celebrated 
faience maker Leroy, published in extenso, and of a long treatise dating of the 
eighteenth century by a Marseilles ceramist cannot well be over estimated. 

The third part of the work is not less well documented and presented. 
The author's treatment of economic questions is thorough and covers labor, 
commerce and exports with logical conclusions as to the decay of the industry. 

All this material is admirably presented in a thick folio of five hundred 
and thirty-four pages, with sixty beautiful phototype plates, eight of which are 
colored. An index adds to the value of a work which is a model of thorough- 
ness and seems to exhaust the official information available on the subject. 
The edition is limited to 500 numbered copies, sold at 60 francs each. 

S. Y. S. 




BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 
ACCESSIONS 

April— June. 1912 



OBJECT 



HOW ACQUIRED 



Ivory Basket, Elaborately Carved, Chinese, about 



1S50 



Lent by Miss A. C. Watmough. 



Porcelain Cup and Saucer, Chinese, about 1750. 

Mounted in French Silver Given by Mr. Samuel P. Avery. 

4 Blue and W'hite Pottery Ointment Jars, Made 

at the Jersey City Pottery about 1S40 Given by Mr. Henry C. Blair. 

Porcelain Sugar Bowl, Creamer, 3 Cups and"^ 

Saucers and 2 Plates, So-Called "Lowestoft," l^- i^r tt . r/- 

Copied from an Old German Tea Set, Chinese, | G'^«" ^V M"- Hampton L. Carson, 
about 1 800 J 

Pottery Tobacco Bowl, Made at Haring Pottery," 
Bucks County, Pa., 1857 

Pottery Harvest Bottle, Made in Eastern Penn- 
sylvania, about 1850 

SHp-Decorated Pottery Dish, Made in Eastern 
Pennsylvania, iSi 5 

Slip-Decorated Flower \'ase and Tray, Made in 
Eastern Pennsylvania, 1804 - 



-Given by Mr. John T. Morris. 



4 Black Pottery Figures, Mexican Lent by Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott. 

Pottery Bowl and Pitcher, Staffordshire, Eng- 
land, about 1845 Lent by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Pottery Dish, Holland, about i8th Century Given by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Maiolica Vase, Polychrome Decoration, Made in 

Puebla. Mexico, about 1820 Bought. 

14 Tiles, Belgian and Spanish Given by Mr. Karl J. Freund. 

Salt Glazed Stoneware Tankard, Grenzhausen Dis-~\ 

trict. Germanv, late 17th Century In w c -i-vr r- j 

Pottery Plaque, Modeled and Applied Decoration. ^Bought-Special Museum Fund. 

Holland, 176S J 

\'ase. Enamel on Metal, Made by C. G. Hall- 
berg, Sweden Given by Mr. Clarence B. Moore. 

Breast Pin, Enamel on Metal, Painted by Wil- 
liam Birch, Philadelphia, about 1825 Bought — Joseph E. Temple Trust. 

5 Large and g Small Gothic Oak Panels > ^- , ^r t 1 T_r 

Oal< Corbel, English, 17th Century | G"'™ by Mrs. John Harrison. 

Gothic Ducal Throne Chair Lent by Mrs. John Harrison. 

Chest, with Inscription "Rich'd Wistar, Jr., 117 

Market St., Philadelphia," i8th Century Given by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Bracket Clock, Dutch, 17th Century Bought — Special Museum Fund. 

7 Glass Paper Weights and 3 Door Props, Con- 
taining Colored Glass Designs, American, 
about 1850 ■ Lent by Dr. Edwin AtLee Barber. 



49 



BULLETIN OF THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

ACCESSIONS— Continued 



CLASS 



Gold and 
Silver 
Work 



Metalwork 



Musical In- 
struments 

Paintings 

Prints 

Textiles 



Miscellan- 
eous 



OBJECT 



HOW ACQUIRED 



^Bought — Special Museum Fund. 



2 Large Pulque Glasses, with Cut Decoration, 

Made in Puebla, Mexico, Early 19th Century.. 
Glass Flask with Enamel Decoration, Swiss, i8th 

Century 

Small Pane of White Glass with Engraved 

Armorial Design, Swiss, Dated 1789 

Silver Teaspoon, French. iSth Century Given by Mr. Samuel P. Avery. 

Pair of Spectacles, Silver FraiTies, Made by Mc- 
Allister, Philadelphia, about 1812 Lent by Mrs. Rudolph Blankenburg. 

Silver Sugar Bowl and Creamer, Made by] 

Anthony Rasch, Philadelphia, 1815 J- Lent by Mrs. Hampton L. Carson. 

Silver Mug, American, Late iSth Century J 

6 Antique Watches and 18 Keys Lent by Mr. Moyer Fleisher. 

Silver Sugar Bowl with Repousse Decoration, 
Made by R. and W. Wilson. Philadelphia, 
about 1830 Lent by Mrs. Clement A. Griscom. 

8 Teaspoons and One Pair of Sugar Tongs, 

Made by Early American Silversmiths Lent by Mrs. John M. Hartman. 

Silver Sugar Bowl and Creamer, Repousse Deco-^ 

ration. Made by Edward Lownes, Philadelphia, 

about i8i9-i8:;4 >-Bought — Special Museum Fund. 

Silver Porringer, Made by Nichols, American, 

about 1800 J 

Brass Bureau Knob, with Bust of John Wilkes, 

Esq.. i8th Century Given by Mrs. William D. Frishmuth. 

Iron Stove Plate, Made by James Old, Reading 

Furnace, Pa., i yyz 

Articulated \\'roiight Iron Dragon, Japanese, iSth 

Century [^Bought. 

8 Brass ^^'atch Cocks, American, Early 19th 

Century 

Pewter Food Bottle, German, 1772 ■ 

Barrel Organ, Made by Astor, London, about 

1 780 Bought— Special Aluseum Fund. 

2 Gothic Pictures of Saints Lent by Mrs. John Harrison. 

Painting of the Madonna and Child, 14th Century Given by Mrs. John Harrison. 

Old Engraving, "St. Peter's First Sermon in the 
City of Jerusalem," From Benjamin West's 
Painting Bought — Special Museum Fund. 

Black Silk Quilted Petticoat, Made about 1776.. Given by Mrs. Esther Y. Adams. 

14 Beaded and Crocheted Bags and Purses I r or,f i.,r m-c tt..™„*.-.« t r^-^^r.^ 

Cross-Stitched Sampler, 1796 I ^^"' ^^ ^^^^- Hampton L. Carson. 

Patchwork Quilt, American, about 1S20 Given by Mrs. George W. Cox. 

White Net Veil, American, about 1820 Given by Miss G. B. Everett 

5 Antique Oriental Rugs and i Saddle Cloth.... Lent by Dr. F. D. Gardiner. 

Man's Chamois Hat, European Lent by Mrs. Jones Wister. 

Silk Drapery for Door, French, Louis XVI. 

style Bought. 

Diplomatic Uniform, Style of 1840 Lent by Mrs. D. C. F. Rivinus. 

Embroidered Coat, French. Period of Louis X\T. 



Embroidered Coat, l-rench. Period of Louis X\T.1 n w c ■ 1 -^r i- j 

Livery Coat, French, Early 19th Century ] "'Ought— Special Museum I-und. 

Wall Paper Box, American, Old 1 ^. 1 -,r t v»r- 

Wooden Cake Mould, Swiss, Early 19th CenturyJ ^■^^'^" '^^ ^^''S- J^nes Wister. 

Collection of Old Furniture Stencils Lent by The Dyke Mill. 



50 



P E N N S Y L VA NIA MUSEUM 

AND SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



MUBCUM eOMMITTCe 



John Story Jemks, Chairman 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 
John H. McFadden 

.!',■. 'I. ^' 'i.llENNV 
Jjii.-, 1 . .\lv.,KIS 

John W. Pepper 
Edgar V. Seeler 



Edward T. Stotesbury 

Mrs. W. T. Carter 

Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 

Miss Fannie S. Macee 

Miss Elizabeth C. Roberts 

Mrs. John Harrison, Ex Officio 

Miss Anna Blanchard, Honorary 



Edwin AtLee Barber, Director of the Museum 

Mrs. Cornelius Stevenson, Assistant Curator and Lecturer 

HONORART CURATORB 

Textiles, Lace and Embroidery Mrs. John Harrison 

Oriental Pottery Mrs. Jones Wister 

European Porcelain Rev. Alfred Duane Peu. 

Arms and Armor Cornelius Stevenson 

Furniture and Woodwork Gustav Ketterer 

Musical Instruments Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 

Prints, Book Plates and Historic Seals Charles E. Dana 

Numismatics F. D. Lancenheim 

Sculpture, Marbles and Casts . . \lexanoer Stirling Caloer 



INSTRUCTION COMMITTEE 



Theodore C. Search, Chairman 
Charles Bond 
Charles E. Dana 
Charles H. Harding 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 
John Story Jenks 
John D. McIlhenny 
Edgar V. Seeler 
G. Henry Stetson 

Mr<^ Tohn TTarrt^ 



Jones Wister 
William Wood 
Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison 
Mrs. F. K. Hipple 
Mrs. Thomas Roherts 
Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 
Mrs. C. Shillard Smith 
Mrs. John Wister 
Mrs. Jones Wister 



ASSOCIATE COWMITTEE OT WOMEN TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEIS 



POCSIOCHT 

Mrs. John Harrison 

StCKCTARY 

Mrs. C. Shillard Smith 



viec-pncsiocNT 

Mrs. Edward H. Ocden 

TRrASURCR 

Mrs. Joseph F. Sinnott 





: Swift Balch 


Mrs. Rodman B. Ellison 


Miss 




i.PH Blankenburg 


Countess Santa Eulalia 


Mrs. 


uss 


Louise W. Bodine 


Miss Cornelia L. Ewing 


Mrs. 


Irs. 


Jasper Yeates Brinton 


Mrs. W. D. Frishmuth 


Mrs. 


;rs. 


John H. Brinton 


Mrs. W. W. Gibbs 


Mrs. 


fss. 


WiLLiAxi T. Carter 


Mrs. C. Leland Harrison 


Miss 




Clyde 


Miss M. S. Hinchman 


Mrs. 




L. CORLIES 


Mrs. F. K. Hipple 


Mrs. 


I>» 


.-VU.1 i>i. Ckozer 


Mrs. J. L. Ketterlinus 


Mrs. 


Irs. 


David E. Dallam 


Miss Nina Lea 


Mrs. 



Fannie S. Magee 
Arthur V. Meigs 
James Mifflin 
Francis F. Milne 
John W. Pepper 
Elizabeth C. Roberts 
Thomas Roberts 
Coijnelius Stevenson 
John Wister 
Jones Wisteb 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Mrs. M. Hampton Todd 



Miss Anna Blanchard